2012 Oct 30 NCIS Critique of “The Namesake”

We tip our hats to the writers and producers of tonight’s episode, “The Namesake.” While most episodes are charged with rough and tumble law enforcement, this show gave Mark Harmon an opportunity to exhibit the full range of his acting ability; showing his tenderness, compassion for a former Marine, and love for his father. We learned what happened to Gibbs’ mother, having never heard before the details of her death. The human story sure eclipsed the investigation of the dead Petty Officer.
The show ended with a touching acknowledgement to the Montford Point Marines, twenty thousand African-American Marines who fought in WWII. Of course, we quickly checked out the group’s website where they mentioned tonight’s show. It was a joy to see Gibbs play peacemaker to his father and his father’s former best friend. This episode revealed why twenty million people watch NCIS—it’s all Gibbs. His eyes are windows, thrown wide open, to his heart. Not only is Gibbs smart, he is a fearless special agent. But he’s so much more. Gibbs has a gentle, humble side. In a word, he is a hero. Americans are searching for real heroes these days.
As far as the team tracking down the killer, bits of evidence were uncovered by McGee, Ziva, Tony, and Abby. Even Ducky performed a psychological profile of the suspect. The idea to draw the prey into a carefully constructed web was brilliant and mirrored David’s techniques in catching the guilty. David noticed a helmet in the dorm room and Diane was struck by the roommate’s shifting eyes and nervous laugh. He gave himself away. Yet, we watched with interest to discover his motive in killing a Marine driving a fast, red, Ferrari. Abby’s scene with the super-rich CEO was over the top and actually boring. She needs to go shopping for a few new, professional outfits. Abby has a terrific brain and should strive to be a better role model for young teens who watch the show.
While we are on our soap box, we’d also like to see Tony and McGee hone their investigative skills more than their “frat boy” shenanigans as Ziva opined. The writers may be angling for younger viewers for the future. Yet tonight brought the schism of two men “who loved the same woman” to center stage. Their forgiveness and redemption was more than satisfying.
David posed one question that went unanswered:
Who was it that thought so much of Leroy Jethro Moore, the Marine, that they named their son Leroy Jethro Gibbs? Was it the baby’s father or his mother? If Jethro had asked that question of his dad and his namesake, it might have resulted in another episode. We may never know. But Ducky put down a marker when he told Gibbs, “You often fail to mention things,” or something similar. Should be interesting to see what is next revealed about Leroy Jethro Gibbs.
Mark Harmon we salute you for your work with youth in Oklahoma and all you do with your character to bring honor to the U.S. Marines, Navy, Army, Air Force, and Coast Guard. Given that some are continuing to die saving the lives of others, we remember our troops in our prayers and ask God to bless this nation!
Stay tuned in two more weeks for the next NCIS show.
Warmly,
Diane and David Munson

By | 2012-10-31T02:10:56+00:00 October 31st, 2012|NCIS|4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Mel November 1, 2012 at 10:24 am - Reply

    I loved that episode too. Mark Harmon is just the best actor. He renders so many emotions on screen. And Gibbs is the hero we all need.

    • danddmunson November 2, 2012 at 1:49 am - Reply

      We agree with Mel. Mark Harmon communicates without speaking. It’s a tilt of the head, a rising brow or a squint of the eyes. We’ll have to wait two weeks to see him again, as next Tuesday night will be election coverage.

  2. Hanh November 2, 2012 at 1:14 pm - Reply

    The Gibbs story was great and really made the show but the crime story was pretty weak and just felt like filler.

    • danddmunson November 2, 2012 at 11:09 pm - Reply

      Hanh makes an interesting point. It is hard for the writers to fully develope two plots during approximately forty minutes (hour minus commercials). Usually one of the plots gets short changed.

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